Korean Import Laws and I-Parcel Customs Clearance

Rhea Smith:

This post by Rural Korea Living gives a thorough explanation on what to do when importing products from Amazon. If you’re in need of help with an i-parcel related question, or unsure how to acquire a customs id as a foreigner, this post is very helpful. Remember, when in doubt, the answer is most likely your ARC number!!

Originally posted on Rural Korea Living:

So, my student and I have had a rather frustrating experience and now that we know what to do, I am typing it all down to share with everyone who is importing things from any country INTO South Korea. I will now tell you exactly what we did and the emails given and everything.

My student and I made a combined purchase, with my account, from Amazon.com on September 27th, 2014. He needed to buy a specific item and it was MUCH cheaper to buy from Amazon than to buy through Gmarket. I also had some items to get, some new shoes from my favorite maker, and a book I’ve been wanting anyway. So we made a deal, I’d buy the items and we’d split the shipping cost and he’d pay me back in a few days. Nice arrangement.  I ordered, Amazon sent me the standard email saying that it…

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Lesson Plan: Food and Animals

This lesson is created to reinforce animal and food related vocabulary, as well as reinforce the “I like” and “I don’t like” phrases. It is created with a grade 2 elementary student in mind, but can be modified to teach or refresh the key vocabulary in most elementary school classrooms.

Click here for the Food and Animals Lesson 3 powerpoint.

Click here for the My Favorite Food pdf file or the  My Favorite Food document file.

Click here for the My Favorite Animal pdf file or the  My Favorite Animal document file.

Vocabulary/Key Language: 

I like _____. I don’t like ______.

What’s this? What’s that?

  • Fish
  • Beef
  • Chicken
  • Vegetables
  • Milk
  • Juice
  • Rice
  • Bread
  • Fruit
  • Kimchi
  • Cheese
  • Ice Cream

Animals Review

  • Dog
  • Bird
  • Pig
  • Mouse
  • Chameleon
  • Lion
  • Giraffe
  • Cat
  • Spider
  • Elephant
  • Chicken

Powerpoint Sections: 

  1. Review key vocabulary.
  2. Key phrases review.
  3. I like food song by Pilar Atiénzar. This song reviews colors as well as new food vocabulary and the phrase “I like _____”.
  4. Review of “I like ______” and “I don’t like ______” with examples of both food and animals. There is an accompanying set of worksheets that can be printed double sided and cut in half. One side will be discussion of animals and the other side will be discussion of food, both using the “I like ____” and “I don’t like _____” key phrases.
  5. A game called “31 Flavors”. This game is played by following the trail. Students are able to say 1-3 of the words in the flow chart. Once they reach number 31, that next player is out and the game continues in the same order or a different order than before, until there is one winner. This game can also be played in smaller groups, or with teams that trade off words.

Lesson Plan: Food

This lesson plan is geared towards younger learners. I have used it for grade 2 students, but it could be adapted to grades 1-4 depending on their level of English. For this lesson, I have incorporated animal vocabulary as a review and food vocabulary as the new key topic.

Click here for the Grade 2 Food powerpoint.

Vocabulary/Key Language: 

I like _____. I don’t like ______.

  • Fish
  • Beef
  • Chicken
  • Vegetables
  • Milk
  • Juice
  • Rice
  • Bread
  • Fruit
  • Kimchi
  • Cheese
  • Ice Cream

Animals Review

  • Dog
  • Bird
  • Pig
  • Mouse
  • Chameleon
  • Lion
  • Giraffe
  • Cat
  • Spider
  • Elephant
  • Chicken

Powerpoint Sections:

  1. New vocabulary: food
  2. I like and I don’t like key phrases review.
  3. The I like/don’t like song. It focuses on chicken, fish, ice cream, and juice. My students LOVED this song, and sing it whenever they see me. It’s a total hit!
  4. Animal review.
  5. Hidden Candy Game: The game is played in teams. Each team will select one of ten sentences on the board. As a team, they will say the sentence. Then, you will reveal the prize behind that sentence, which can range from 1-4 candy points. There is also a slide that shows a mouse with a bag on its back. The team to uncover this slide will steal 1-2 points from another team. This game has has 10 sentences and 3 slides, for a total of 30 sentences/words reviewed.

Lesson Plan: Animals

If you’re in need of a simple lesson plans for young learners, this lesson plan focuses on Animals. I have used it for grade 2 elementary students but could be suitable for grade 1-4 depending on their level of English.

Click here for the Grade 2 Animals – What’s This and What’s That powerpoint.

Click here for the PDF Animal Cards.

Click here for the DOC file for the Animal Cards.

Vocabulary/Key Language:

 What’s this? What’s that?

  • Giraffe
  • Dog
  • Bird
  • Pig
  • Mouse
  • Cat
  • Spider
  • Chameleon
  • Lion
  • Elephant
  • Chicken

Powerpoint Sections: 

  1. Animals with Pictures
  2. What’s this? What’s That? Review of Animals through hidden animal pictures.
  3. Telephone Game – You can use the included picture cards, or simply write the words on a classroom board and whisper the animal in the student’s ear. I play this game by having the students act out the animal through movement and no talking.
  4. Secret Picture Game – Click to reveal the hidden animal picture.

Discovering Korea: Busan in Winter

While most of Korea is shrouded in winter snow, Busan is chilly, yet more comfortably warm. Here are some of the beautiful sites in Busan that can, and should, be viewed all year round!

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^ Gamcheon Village ^

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^ Dong Hyun Motel on Gwanganli Beach ^

Only 50,000 won a night for an ocean view room.

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^ Yonggungsa Temple ^

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Know your beef cut!

Rhea Smith:

This is a WONDERFUL blog post about the differences between Korean and US meat cuts. It has the Korean names for beef and pork cuts, and does a great job explaining how these cuts match similar US cuts. Check it out!

Originally posted on KIMCHIMARI:

I recently bought some brisket from an American grocery store. But when I brought it home and cooked it, it looked and tasted different from the Yangjimeori (양지머리 – also labeled “brisket”) that I usually buy from the Korean supermarket. And this is not the first time– it has happened to me many times before and always wondered why. I had a feeling that maybe the two cuts were not from the same part of the brisket. And so I started my quest for the truth..

I have researched for hours on end trying to figure out how Korean beef cuts and US beef cuts correspond to each other. OK, yes, they use quite different primal cuts (primal cuts are largest units of cuts that is further divided into individual retail cuts that are sold at stores) – and that’s fine. But what confused me terribly were the English cut…

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